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Southern Stars: Abstracts Volume 42: March 2003 to December 2003.


No 1 March 2003 No 2 June 2003 No 3 September 2003 No 4 December 2003
March 2003 June 2003 September 2003 December 2003
 
  Southern Stars:
Vol 42 Contents.
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Southern Stars:  Volume 42,  number 1. March 2003.  Pp 1 - 32
  1. The Total Eclipse of 2002 December 4
  2. Stardate 2003
  3. Johann Schröter, William Herschel and the Mountains of Venus
  4. Comet C/2002 V1 Neat
  5. Hydrogen-Alpha Solar Observing
  6. Book Reviews
Mar 03

The Total Solar Eclipse of 2002 December 4
Pauline and Brian Loader, Stephen Voss, Taka Okada, Garry Telford.
Four articles describing different observers' views, and photography of the total eclipse of the Sun as seen from Ceduna and Woomera in South Australia.
Volume 42, number 1. March 2003. Pp 3 - 8

North Island Stardate 2003
Lesley Hall and Ian Cooper
Upwards of 150 people, including some visitors from North America and Europe, enjoyed a programme of stimulating talks and workshops, good observing, videos and audio-visuals, and lots of mixing and mingling.
Volume 42, number 1. March 2003. Pp 8 - 10

Johann Schröter, William Herschel and the Mountains of Venus
Andrew James
Since the invention of the telescope the observations of atmospheric phenomena regarding Venus have always proved difficult. Some early observers reported variations in the curvature of the cusps and so-called "terminator anomalies". It was these particular anomalies and their interpretation that lead to a somewhat passionate debate, mainly between Friedrich Wilhelm (later William) Herschel (1738-1822) and his fellow compatriot Johann Heironymous Schröter (1748-1816). Schröter assumed that the direct cause of the irregularities, especially near the southern cusp, was a mountain or a mountain range - a Venusian Himalayas, while Herschel concluded the 'alleged' cause of the Venusian anomalies could possibly be attributed to Schröter's tarnished speculum mirror. This paper also discusses the life and observations of Shröter and attempts to explain the basis of his reputation as a poor and unreliable observer.
Volume 42, number 1. March 2003. Pp 11- 22

Comet C/2002 V1 Neat
Ian Cooper, Mike McGavin, Paul Moss, Noel Munford and Stephen Voss
Comet C/2002 V1 Neat became visible in New Zealand skies about a week after perihelion on 2003 February 18.3. A series of photographs by a number of observers is presented.
Volume 42, number 1. March 2003. Pp 16 - 17

Hydrogen-Alpha Solar Observing
Harry Roberts
Three aspects of observing the Sun through a Hydrogen-alpha filter are described with examples from the author's sketches; Quiet Prominences, an Eruptive Prominence and Prominence motion by tuning the H-alpha filter for different Doppler Shifts.
Volume 42, number 1. March 2003. Pp 17 - 27

Book Reviews
"Apollo - the Lost and Forgotten Missions" by David J Shayler, reviewed by Steve Butler.
"The Hundred Greatest Stars" by James B Kaler, reviewed by Bob Evans.
Volume 42, number 1. March 2003. Pp 28 - 30


Southern Stars:  Volume 42,  number 2.  June 2003.  Pp 1 - 28
  1. Possum Observatory

  2. A Lifetime of Auroral Observing

  3. Roemer and the Speed of Light

  4. Annual Report of Council for 2002

  5. Book Reviews
Jun 03

Possum Observatory
John Drummond.
Want to get dizzy? Just step into Possum Observatory - a 3.4m x 3.1m rotating building and you'll walk through the observatory door in one part of the backyard and then out the door in a different part of the backyard! This article recalls how I made this rotating observatory, what scopes I have in it, and what astronomical work I am doing.
Volume 42, number 2. June 2003. Pp 3 - 5

A Lifetime of Auroral Observing
Reg C Sutherland.
When we are very young, sometimes an event will capture our imagination and we will continue to pursue the phenomenon for the rest of our lives. In my case, while living at Pukemaori, away in the South, I saw a spectacular auroral display during the mid-1930s. The sky was ablaze with flashing coloured lights. I was told it was caused by sunlight reflecting of the ice in the Antarctic. How wrong they were!
Volume 42, number 2. June 2003. Pp 6 - 7

Roemer and the Speed of Light
Brian Loader.
In 1676 Roemer published a paper in which he established the finite speed of light from observations of the times of eclipses of the satellite Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites. His method for doing this can easily be adapted by observers to make their own estimates of the speed of light. Fairly short term variations in the period of Io limit the accuracy which can be obtained.
Volume 42, number 2. June 2003. Pp 8 - 12

Annual Report of Council for 2002
Council of the Royal Astronomical Society of New Zealand.
Includes Presidential, Financial and Membership Reports, together with reports on publications and from sections.
Volume 42, number 2. June 2003. Pp 13 - 23

Book Reviews
"Observing Variable Stars" by Gerry A Good, reviewed by Albert Jones.
"Illustrated Dictionary of Practical Astronomy" by Chris Kitchin, reviewed by Marilyn Head.
"More Small Astronomical Observatories" edited by Patrick Moore, reviewed by Duncan Hall.
Volume 42, number 2. June 2003. Pp 24 - 27


Southern Stars:  Volume 42,  number 3.  September 2003.  Pp 1 - 20
  1. Images of Mars
  2. Pamela M Kilmartin, FRANZ
  3. Carter Memorial Lecture 2003
  4. 2002 Murray Geddes Prize
  5. Collimation: Reflections from a Different Angle
  6. Book Review
  7. To Learn or Understand in Science
  8. Two New Variables in Centaurus
Sep 03

Images of Mars
Gary Beal.
During the 2003 very close opposition of the planet Mars, a number of New Zealand amateur astronomers took images of the planet through their telescopes. Many took advantage of the relatively inexpensive Philips ToUcam 'Webcam'; a small video camera used at a computer for videoconferencing. This is one person's experiences.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. Pp 3 - 4

Pamela M Kilmartin, FRANZ
Pamela Kilmartin was elected a Fellow of the RASNZ at the 2003 RASNZ AGM and Conference. A brief resume of her contributions to astronomy is given.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. P 5

Carter Memorial Lecture 2003
Robin Gledhill.
The 2003 Carter Memorial Lecture was given in May by Dr Ben R Oppenheimer, Kalbfleisch Research Fellow in the Department of Astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Public lectures entitled "Aliens: The Scientific Search for Life on Other Planets" were given in Nelson, Dunedin, Christchurch, Wellington, Wanganui, Napier, Hamilton and Auckland. University seminars entitled "The Lyot Project" were given in Christchurch, Wellington, Hamilton and Auckland.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. P 6

2002 Murray Geddes Prize
Marilyn Head was awarded the 2002 Murray Geddes prize. A brief resume of her contributions to young person's astronomy is given.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. P 7

Collimation: reflections from a different angle
Howard Page.
This article is based on a talk on collimation - specifically primary mirror alignment, given to a group of people with an interest in the topic, at the Wellington Astronomical Society meeting.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. Pp 8 - 10

Book Review: "Night Skies Above New Zealand" by Vicki Hyde
R W Evans.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. P 11

To Learn or to Understand in Science Education
Frank P Andrews.
See December 2003, Pp 20 - 21, for corrected re-print.
This paper was delivered at the 2003 RASNZ conference.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. Pp 12 - 13

Two New Variables in Centaurus
W H Allen, FRASNZ.
While observing WX Centauri I found two un-catalogued variable stars in the CCD field.  This paper examines the light curves obtained to determine the type of variable star.
Volume 42, number 3. September 2003. Pp 14 - 18


Southern Stars:  Volume 42,  number 4.  December 2003.  Pp 1 - 28
  1. Volume 42, number 4: December 2003
  2. Thomas King Observatory
  3. Thomas King Telescope
  4. Thomas King - H-Alpha Filter
  5. Aspects of the Restricted Three Body Problem
  6. Sharing Observing Logs on the Internet
  7. The Sun in 2002
  8. Early Astronomy in Hawera
  9. To Learn or Understand in Science
  10. "Biggest Sunspot Ever." Behind the Hype
  11. "Book Review: "The Modern Moon"
Dec 03

Thomas King Observatory
Ataira Te Ao Nui.
The Thomas King Observatory in Wellington, near the Crter Observatory, is now in constant use following the restoraion of it and its telescope. This paper introduces the history of the observatory.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. P 3

Refurbishment of the Thomas King Telescope at Carter Observatory
Gordon Hudson.
In May 2001 I began the refurbishment of the 5inch Grubb Telescope housed in the Thomas King Observatory. This telescope was made in 1882 by Grubb in Dublin and over its 120 years it is in remarkably good condition.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. Pp 4 - 6

The H-alpha Solar Filter at the Thomas King Observatory
Stewart Mawson.
I had the satisfaction of installing the Coronado T60 H-alpha solar filter on the 5 inch Grubb telescope at the Thomas King Observatory.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. P 7

Aspects of the Restricted Three Body Problem
Warwick Kissling.
An extended version of a talk presented at the 2003 RASNZ conference in Christchurch. This paper preents a study of asteroi motions near the L4 and L5 Langrangian points in the restricted three body problem. Where the asteroid remains close to the L4 or L5 points, some analysis is possible which reveals rich behaviour abd an unexpected relationship involving Pythagorean triplets.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. Pp 8 - 11

The Singularity System: Sharing Observing Logs on the Internet
Miks McGavin.
A large number of amateur astronomers in New Zealand and around the world keep logs of their observations. One disadvantage with observing logs for some people is that they are not normally accessible to anyone besides the person who made the observations. In the past decade, computers and more recently the Internet have made it easier for information to be organised and propogated widely. This article presents a new method for astronomical observing logs to be published online via a central website, allowing people to keep ttrack of hat everyone else is doing, and communicate about their activities.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. Pp 12 - 15

The Sun in 2002
R W Evans.
A summary of white light observations of the Sun in 2002, as reported to teh RASNZ Aurora and Solar Section, is presented. They year saw the beginning of the decline from Solar Maximum of Solar Cycle 23. Eleven observers supplied a total of 1724 observations for the year to the Section.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. P 16

Early Astronomy in Hawera
Ian Townsend, Don Glass. The birth of Astronomy in Hawera is linked significantly with George Mortimer Townsend. Don Glass has compiled this history from details supplied by Mr Ian Townsend, George Townsend's son.
.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. Pp 17 - 19

To Learn or to Understand in Science Education
Frank P Andrews.
The Carter Observatory has been involved in education since it began operation in 1941. In the sixty years since its founding this education programme has steadily developed in scope and student throughput.  The present programme is dedicated to enthusing students in science and astronomy as well as the related areas of scientific understanding.  We stress participation and gaining understanding in our approach. In this paper we look at the vital difference in approach and outcomes between students who are expected to learn science as opposed to those gaining an understanding of the subject and look at how we are dealing with astronomy instruction at Carter Observatory.
This paper was delivered at the 2003 RASNZ conference. This is a corrected version of the paper originally printed in Volume 42, number 3, September 2003.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. Pp 20 - 21

"Biggest Sunspot Ever. Honest!" - Behind the Hype.
Harry Roberts.
Keen sunspot observers are still reeling from the fantastic sloar activity of the last few years (and months), which encompassed the maximumof Solar Cycle No. 23. This cycle seems to have produced some of the greatest flares so far recorded. But are they?
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. Pp 22 - 24

Book Review - "The Modern Moon: A Personal View" by Charles A Wood.
R W Evans.
Volume 42, number 4. December 2003. Pp 25 - 26


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